How To Tighten A Safety On A Stiletto Knife

Help building,making,repairing or customizing your knife

How To Tighten A Safety On A Stiletto Knife

Postby ExiledExports » Wed Jun 17, 2015 3:20 am

Use a good quality pair of small jaw pliers [needle nose or ignition type] grasp the safety button and twist it slightly clockwise.
Check it and see if it's improved. Do this a little at a time, if you hurry or twist too far you will twist it off.
The button is attached to a flat piece that goes through the handle.
Image
You are twisting that flat piece so it "rubs" against the side of the slot in the handle, creating friction.
Do a very slight twist and check to see if it's tighter. Repeat this until it improves. Once it's "just about right" STOP -close enough is good enough.

Italian makers have a tool for this. It is a small piece of thin metal with a slot in the end. It slides under the button and the slot slips over the flat piece that goes through the handle.
Cut a slot in a gauge set and you can use this as in the photo I have attached.

Also some guys use dental floss or thread and wrap it around the safety to add friction and so it does not scrap on the handle scale.

The "flat piece [or rod] of the safety that goes through the handle makes the friction or contact with the sides of groove for the safety rod that protrudes through handle this governs the tightness. Turning the part that protrudes (not top or actual button) slightly will cause more contact with the sides of groove than if the rod is parallel to the groove. By twisting clockwise it also forces the tab up to the handle scale and away from the liner making it tighter in the handle groove which is routered out.
Attachments
switchblade safety feeler guage two holes end and side.JPG
switchblade safety feeler guage two holes end and side.JPG (85.24 KiB) Viewed 4172 times
User avatar
ExiledExports
Site Admin
 
Posts: 173
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2014 9:28 pm
Location: Planet Earth

Re: How To Tighten A Safety On A Stiletto Knife

Postby Rubens Blades » Wed Jun 17, 2015 4:33 am

Yup,that works for sure,and will work for most collectors out there. My issue with that method is that you are creating a way for the metal safety to scrape against the softer (handle material) safety slot and make it even wider eventually.

Another way, if you do not have that tool and the safety slot is kinda wide is to layer the edges of the slot with super glue. Use a needle,take your time and place about 3 layers of super glue on the edges of the safety slot. Do one position at a time (up and down) and then let it dry for 24 hours each time.

Make sure you have done all of that first. Then check the movement of the safety before going any further. :D :D

As a side note, I will tell you that this method is NOT for people that have unsteady hands. It needs to be pretty accurate so you don't have globs of glue all over the place. :mrgreen:
User avatar
Rubens Blades
 
Posts: 433
Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2014 1:00 am
Location: Earth

Re: How To Tighten A Safety On A Stiletto Knife

Postby ExiledExports » Tue Mar 08, 2016 8:37 pm

Ok, I had a question as to why the safety slips on a stiletto.

Well, the only way a tight button becomes loose is pressing the button while the lock is up.

So if the lock is up and you put it in your pocket and it is pressed up against your leg in your pants or on somehow with an object that you are carrying the issue can happen.

The most common is user error, handing a knife to someone that does not know how they work.

You will see this at gun shows when people pick them up off the table and press the button as hard as they can while the lock is up.

It is normal for stupidity to go into full force when someone can not figure things out that they must being brutes and push and squeeze things will all their might.

So the ultimate damage is by a person who has the lock up and tries to open the knife and presses the button with excessive force.
User avatar
ExiledExports
Site Admin
 
Posts: 173
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2014 9:28 pm
Location: Planet Earth

Re: How To Tighten A Safety On A Stiletto Knife

Postby Rubens Blades » Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:46 am

This is true,but it also starts with the build itself. The safety needs to be bent properly so it provides maximum tension between the handle material and the liner/button assembly.

The problem when you are building, is that it is a pain in the ass to get that tension right and then to pin a handle to the liner. When bent properly,the handle wants to pop off the liner from that tension when you are trying to pin it. A lot of people just give up and don't go for that maximum tension.

So the trick is to hold that handle to the liner and pin the bottom handle pin first. Then worry about the two top handle pins,after the bottom one is already secured.


This trick will keep the safety working better,longer,and will keep the safety working properly from being in a pocket,or being carried but will not help when someone uses all their force to try to fire a knife with the safety engaged. :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
User avatar
Rubens Blades
 
Posts: 433
Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2014 1:00 am
Location: Earth


Return to Ask Rubens Blades

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron